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PostScript

User community support forum for Apache OpenOffice, LibreOffice and all the OpenOffice.org derivatives

Postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

Postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by letmo » Wed Dec 26, 2007 12:10 pm

Re: postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by foxcole » Wed Dec 26, 2007 5:43 pm

Those last two are not graphic file formats. Insert> Picture can only work with supported graphic formats. Currently, EPS, I believe, is not well supported by Writer; you’d have to do the intermediary step you were referring to, to import the EPS into Draw and convert it to a format Writer can use.

Word itself can’t read PDF or other Postscript files. it will try to do the same kind of file conversion as you’re seeing with Writer, for the same reasons noted above. PDF or Postscript is not a supportable format in a document editor. You’ll have to do the file conversion no matter what word processor you’re in.

I doubt you’ll ever see this capability in OpenOffice or Microsoft Office or any other non-Adobe word processor. To import means to convert to a format editable by the application you’re importing into, and Adobe holds tight reins over licenses to edit PDF and other PS formats. rightfully so. The ability to edit them is how Adobe continues to earn profits on its proprietary formats. Why would they give that away?

Re: postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by letmo » Fri Dec 28, 2007 1:40 pm

Yes, you are right. I use both readers you mentioned but not Acrobat Pro, thus PDF OLE is not an option for me.

Thank you for this suggestion. If I got it right, you should be able to access this file from http://www.mediafire.com/?ergww9kwct1 . Your comments are greatly appreciated, since I use the producing application "NCL" a lot (NCL graphics output formats: http://www.ncl.ucar.edu/Document/Graphi . _wks.shtml ).

Word itself can’t read PDF or other Postscript files. it will try to do the same kind of file conversion as you’re seeing with Writer, for the same reasons noted above. PDF or Postscript is not a supportable format in a document editor. You’ll have to do the file conversion no matter what word processor you’re in.

I doubt you’ll ever see this capability in OpenOffice or Microsoft Office or any other non-Adobe word processor. To import means to convert to a format editable by the application you’re importing into, and Adobe holds tight reins over licenses to edit PDF and other PS formats. rightfully so. The ability to edit them is how Adobe continues to earn profits on its proprietary formats. Why would they give that away?

Let me clarify. It is not important for me to have a conversion "to a format editable by the application you’re importing into" (i.e. by OOo). But some months ago, when I was still using MS Word, whenever I imported an NCL-produced EPS into MS Word, I got the impression that during import the EPS was converted into a (MS Word-internal) graphics format that still maintained its vector data structure . This means the imported graphics were still scalable without quality loss thanks to the vector format. This scalability is what I liked so much about the MS Word EPS import.

Re: postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by foxcole » Fri Dec 28, 2007 4:19 pm

That’s not quite true.

Re: postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by letmo » Fri Dec 28, 2007 5:52 pm

Files like the one I posted do not contain this kind of preview. The situation you describe is not the problem I encounter. (WMF is a vector format.)

Regardless, I might recommend you try other file formats. although I’m not sure of your printing capabilities and needs. I hope this at least helped.

Unfortunately I do not have much choice. My job is to produce and analyse scientific data in NetCDF format, and IMHO the two best freeware tools that can handle this format are Ferret (only .ps output) and NCL (.ps, .pdf and .eps output). I can’t change their output, and I can’t afford Matlab, IDL, AVS licenses either.

So I produce my data and graphics in the Linux world and I produce my scientific output in Linux or Windows using LyX (LaTeX) for articles and OOo for cooperation and presentations. For the latter I need to find a way to bridge the gap between these worlds.

Thanks for having a look anyway. If only I could import it into Draw and from there to Impress or Writer I’d be happy for the time being! If you – or some reader of this post – could point me to the source of format mismatch then I could try to approach the NCL developers over this issue. Maybe they know how to tweak the file, NCL or OOo.

This is precisely the format I could successfully import into MS Office without format mismatch using an import method that is briefly introduced here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Encapsulated_PostScript#Beyond_previews.

Re: postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by acknak » Fri Dec 28, 2007 7:11 pm

Re: postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by foxcole » Fri Dec 28, 2007 7:51 pm

What I described was the nature of EPS files, which nothing can change and nothing has changed since EPS was developed. I’ve no idea what you mean by that not being the problem.

You’re quite right about that. I’m accustomed to its working with raster graphics, which I use almost exclusively, so my mind pretty much dropped the vector aspect. I had no reason to remember it, I suppose.

So I produce my data and graphics in the Linux world and I produce my scientific output in Linux or Windows using LyX (LaTeX) for articles and OOo for cooperation and presentations. For the latter I need to find a way to bridge the gap between these worlds.

You have my sympathies! It appears you’re stuck with making sure the EPS previews are high-quality WMF format.

That bit I wrote about the 2.0 version isn’t right. I found another EPS on my computer that’s version 3.0 and doesn’t receive that error, so there’s just something in the construction of the EPS file that doesn’t pass the weak EPS filters in OOo.

I’m pretty sure Draw uses the same EPS file filter as Writer and Impress, so I’m not sure using Draw would make much of a difference. :-/

Re: postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by letmo » Sun Dec 30, 2007 4:47 am

That bit I wrote about the 2.0 version isn’t right. I found another EPS on my computer that’s version 3.0 and doesn’t receive that error, so there’s just something in the construction of the EPS file that doesn’t pass the weak EPS filters in OOo.

Ghostscript has been used in the past by other OOo users to "repair" EPS files. That might help in this case. it would add a step to your process but at least you could still use your process.

Thank you both for these suggestions. It works! I did (a) "eps2eps" on openSuse with its Ghostscript 8.15 and (b) "epswrite" on Win XP from GSview 4.9 with its Ghostscript 8.61 and the result for both is same: The original %!PS-Adobe-2.0 EPSF-2.0 is converted into %!PS-Adobe-3.0 EPSF-3.0 . It seems that NCL produces an older EPS file format (2.0) that is not recognized by OOo. The converted 3.0 Linux file version (a) is availale at http://www.mediafire.com/?9mcmzo9eywz.

I’m pretty sure Draw uses the same EPS file filter as Writer and Impress, so I’m not sure using Draw would make much of a difference. :-/

Yes, I agree with you; so far I found they all behave the same regarding my old and new EPS files.

Here I observed a different behaviour of my OOo 2.3.1 between openSuse 10.2 and Win XP. My OOo on openSuse generates a preview, while on Win XP it doesn’t (instead it draws a red frame with three text lines on Creator, Date and Language Level). However, Ghostscript is installed on both systems. Therefore, based on your comment, I guess that OOo may not be aware that Ghostscript is available on my Win XP. If possible, could you please let me know how to proceed?

The utilities you mentioned: are they available as OOo plugins, makros or the like on Linux or Windows?

Re: postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by acknak » Sun Dec 30, 2007 6:49 am

Sorry, no. I don’t know anything about how OOo generates the preview, or what the requirements are (other than Ghostscript)–especially on Windows.

Both IM and GS are external programs, not part of, or integrated with, OOo in any way. OOo merely runs the program(s) if they are available. You could just as well run it yourself on the EPS file before you insert it in your document; in fact, that would be the workaround if you can’t get OOo to generate the preview for you. You can just bundle up eps2eps and convert in a little script and run that on your EPS files created by NCL, to prepare them for use in OOo.

Re: postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by letmo » Tue Apr 15, 2008 11:57 am

> output (header starts with "%!PS-Adobe-2.0 EPSF-2.0") whereas it is

> able to import the newer EPS format (header starts with "%!PS-

> Adobe-3.0 EPSF-3.0"). I refer to "direct import" as "without the

> use of an external converter"; I’d be happy to avoid such an

> additional postprocessing step.

> Is there a way to tell NCL to produce 3.0 EPS files, or any chance

> NCL’s EPS output format could be updated in a future NCL release?

compatible with level 2. Some printers will not yet accept Level 3 and that is why

we hesitate to flag our Postscript files at Level 3. It is my opinion that any printer

or application that honors Level 3 should accept Level 2.

Re: postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by foxcole » Tue Apr 15, 2008 4:14 pm

compatible with level 2. Some printers will not yet accept Level 3 and that is why

we hesitate to flag our Postscript files at Level 3. It is my opinion that any printer

or application that honors Level 3 should accept Level 2.

Please understand this is a user-to-user forum, so we have no more control over what is considered for future releases than any other user does. You might have more luck asking that question on the OOo wiki or posting it as an issue (if it has not already been) in the IssueTracker. You’ll need to register and log in to post but not to search.

Re: postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by acknak » Tue Apr 15, 2008 5:00 pm

It’s a little hard to follow there, but you can see that no matter what the header says, the original file content always fails (top+bottom rows). OTOH, no matter what the header says, or whether the content is level 2+3 or level 1, the file content after processing by eps2eps always works (middle rows).

Re: postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by acknak » Tue Apr 15, 2008 7:15 pm

Re: postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by foxcole » Tue Apr 15, 2008 8:43 pm

Re: postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by letmo » Wed Apr 16, 2008 12:02 pm

the file is still probably Encapsulated PostScript, but the bounding box is given at the end of the file. [. ] (The bounding box is given in this way when the program that generated the PostScript couldn’t know the size in advance, or was too lazy to compute it.)

Thus, if it is possible for NCL to calculate the bounding box size in advance, the problem could be solved on their side. If this is not possible, then running epstool would be a workaround solution for me. A general solution would be to enable OOo to handle the "%%BoundingBox: (atend)" statement. A search for "atend" in Issue Tracker shows that this problem has been raised in Issue 9357 and is currently handled as Issue 28260 with priority P4.

Re: postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by acknak » Wed Apr 16, 2008 4:04 pm

Re: postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by letmo » Thu Apr 17, 2008 9:31 am

that we have on our list, but it requires that the information needs to be gathered

during the file creation and then inserted at the beginning when the picture

is terminated. Since we create the file during execution instead of saving it

in a buffer and writing it at the end, we would have to read the file that has

been created and then re-write it with the bounding box information inserted.

Since the ps2ps and ps2epsi tools are readily available, we have not assigned

a high priority to this task. My recommendation would be to write a normal

Postscript file and then run that through ps2ps. The version of ps2ps that I

have (which is two years old) also changes the Postscript level from 2 to 3.

Re: postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by xxhc » Sat Jul 05, 2008 6:53 pm

Re: postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by foxcole » Sun Jul 06, 2008 5:09 am

This is a user-to-user forum. To make your voice heard, you need to go vote for and/or add comments to the issues you found in the issue tracker. This increases the issue’s visibility because it helps increase the issue’s ‘popularity’ ranking, one of many aspects that figure into an issue’s priority assignment.

Re: Postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by markush » Tue Oct 07, 2008 9:51 pm

Re: Postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by Bhikkhu Pesala » Tue Oct 07, 2008 9:59 pm

OOo 3.0.X on Ms Windows XP

Re: Postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by markush » Wed Oct 08, 2008 9:35 am

Re: Postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by acknak » Wed Oct 08, 2008 5:58 pm

Re: Postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by markush » Wed Oct 08, 2008 6:08 pm

Re: Postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by acknak » Wed Oct 08, 2008 7:59 pm

Re: Postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by markush » Wed Oct 08, 2008 8:11 pm

Re: Postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by acknak » Thu Oct 09, 2008 9:42 pm

Re: Postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by shardalule » Mon Jul 26, 2010 12:16 pm

Re: Postscript import (PS, EPS, PDF): EPS fails

by Hagar Delest » Mon Jul 26, 2010 12:27 pm

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Save your publication as a page-independent PostScript file for commercial printing

PostScript

Save your publication as a page-independent PostScript file for commercial printing

When you use the Pack and Go Wizard to pack your publication and related files to take to a commercial printing service, Microsoft Office Publisher creates a Zip file and a PDF file for your commercial printer. Discuss with your commercial printer if these are the files that they need you to deliver. If these are not the types of files that they work with, your commercial printer may ask you to produce a PostScript file.

Note: You can save as a PDF or XPS file from a 2007 Microsoft Office system program only after you install an add-in. For more information, see Enable support for other file formats, such as PDF and XPS.

A commercial printing service may ask you for a PostScript file for any of several reasons:

They might not accept Publisher files.

They might not work with PDF files.

They might use only Macintosh computers.

As part of their prepress process, the commercial printing service may use a trapping or page-imposition program that requires using page-independent PostScript files that contain font-download information for every page of a multipage publication.

The pages in a page-independent PostScript file can be rearranged or printed selectively by a third-party program without affecting how the other pages of the PostScript file print. PostScript files can be printed only on a PostScript printer and you cannot make changes to a PostScript file after you have saved it.

Important: Consult with your commercial printing service to determine if you need to save your publication as a page-independent PostScript file and whether to save it as a color-separated file or as a composite file.

What do you want to do?

Save as a color-separated PostScript file

On the File menu, click Save As.

In the File name box, type a name for the file. You don’t need to type a file name extension. Publisher automatically adds .ps to the end of the file name you type.

In the Save as type list, select PostScript.

In the Printer name list, select the PostScript printer or imagesetter that you want. If necessary, install a PostScript printer.

Consult your commercial printing service about which PostScript printer you should install and where you should install it from.

On the Start menu in Microsoft Windows XP, click Printers and Faxes.

Under Printer Tasks, click Add a Printer.

Follow the instructions in the Add Printer Wizard.

Click Properties, and then click the Advanced tab.

Under printer name Advanced Document Settings, expand Document Options, and then expand PostScript Options.

In the PostScript Output Option list, select Optimize for Portability.

On the Printer Details tab, click Advanced Printer Setup, and then click the Separations tab.

In the Print colors as list, click Separations.

In the These plates list, do one of the following:

Click All defined inks to print a spot-color or process-color plate for every ink you have defined in the publication (Tools menu, Commercial Printing Tools submenu, Color Printing command).

Click Used inks only to print a spot-color or process-color plate for every defined ink that is used in the publications.

Click Convert spot to process to print only process-color plates and convert all defined spot colors to process colors.

To set other print options that your printing service recommends, click the options you want on the Page Settings tab and the Graphics and Fonts tab, and then click OK.

Save as a composite PostScript file

On the File menu, click Save As.

In the File name box, type a name for the file. You don’t need to type a file name extension — Publisher automatically adds .ps to the end of the file name you type.

In the Save as type list, select PostScript.

In the Printer name list, select the PostScript printer or imagesetter that you want. If necessary, install a PostScript printer.

Consult your commercial printing service about which PostScript printer you should install and where you should install it from.

On the Start menu in Microsoft Windows XP, click Printers and Faxes.

Under Printer Tasks, click Add a Printer.

Follow the instructions in the Add Printer Wizard.

Click Properties, and then click Advanced.

Under printer name Advanced Document Settings, expand Document Options, and then expand PostScript Options.

In the PostScript Output Option list, select Optimize for Portability.

On the Printer Details tab, click Advanced Printer Setup, and then click the Separations tab.

In the Print colors as list, do one of the following:

Click Composite Grayscale to save a composite PostScript file that will be printed to a black and white printer.

Click Composite CMYK to save a composite PostScript file that you can use in a third-party trapping or page-imposition program, or to print to a CMYK proofing device.

Click Composite RGB to save a composite PostScript file that will be printed to a color printer.

Note: To save a composite CMYK or RGB PostScript file, you must have a color PostScript printer selected.

To set other print options that your printing service recommends, click the options that you want on the Page Settings tab and the Graphics and Fonts tab, and then click OK.

PostScript Problems

PostScript

PostScript

This is supposed to work. The one instance where I tried it, it didn’t. Maybe it works in other instances. To move and/or scale the postscript code, add the following after every command “showpage” in your PostScript file:

Reasonable values for A4 printout on US Letter are as follows (but it depends on margins):

General Postscript Problems

Here is a document which describes how to solve problems associated with printing PostScript files. The major problem is printing MS generated PS files. These files are actually EPSF files and this language does not handle multi-paged documents.

Currently in the works is configuring our printers to recognize EPSF files or specifying a printer such as snidely-epsf. Until then, you can use my printps2 print script. Just type:

PostScript code is produced by many programs on the market. Unfortunately, the authors of these didn’t take the time to read the documentation on the Adobe Document Structuring Conventions (DSC) contained in the PostScript Language Reference Manual, 2nd Edition. Consequently, there are a number of common errors that occur in PostScript files, which cause grief when the PostScript is processed by a document manager such as GSview or Ghostview.

Automatically Convert PostScript to PDF

PostScript

Automatically Convert PostScript to PDF

watchDirectory Online Helpfile

watchDirectory Help

Standard version: $79 USD

Professional version: $149 USD

watchDirectory Help > Plugins > Automatically run .bat files > Automatically Convert PostScript to PDF

Automatically Convert PostScript to PDF

This script is started by watchDirectory to automatically convert PostScript® files, typically with a PS or EPS extension, to PDF (Portable Document Format). When a new PostScript file is detected in the monitored directory, watchDirectory starts this script to convert it to PDF. This makes watchDirectory a low cost alternative to Adobe® Acrobat® Distiller® (discontinued by Adobe, replaced by Adobe LiveCycle® PDF Generator).

What you need

The script uses AFPL Ghostscript to perform the actual conversion. You can download AFPL Ghostscript here.

If the link above does not work anymore, please download the latest version via http://www.cs.wisc.edu/

Settings for this script

The upper half of the settings dialog contains general settings for all scripts that can be started by the Automatically run .bat files plugin. Please see that page for instructions.

GSDIR – Where did you install Ghostscript

Here you enter the location where Ghostscript is installed. Older versions of Ghostscript by default install in C:\GS\GS8.XX. The current versions install in C:\Program Files\GS\GS8.5X. Press the “Browse” button to locate the directory.

OVERWRITE – If the PDF file already exists

If the target PDF file already exists, you can choose to overwrite or rename the existing PDF. If you choose to rename it, the script will add underscores to its name to make it unique.

TARGETDIR – Place the PDF files in this directory

Where should the new PDF files be created?

DELETEPS – Delete PostScript file after conversion to PDF

When the PDF is created, the script can automatically remove the original postscript file.

TIP – Add extra functionality

Ghostscript can do a lot more than just convert to PDF. Your install of Ghostscript comes with a lot of documentation about extra parameters you can use to add functionality. Please look at the document C:\Program Files\gs\gs8.53\doc\Ps2pdf.htm (change according to your version of Ghostscript).

Example: create password protected PDF files

To make the PDF password protected, we need to add 2 commandline options when the Ghostscript PS2PDF.BAT file is started. These options are

-sOwnerPassword=pwd1 -sUserPassword=pwd2

  • Start the watchDirectory Control Center.
  • Press Ctrl+9 (or use the “Tools -> Explore Task Directory” menu option) to open the directory where watchDirectory stores all your task information.
  • Open the sub directory with the same name you just gave to the new task.
  • Inside this directory you will find the script that is started by watchDirectory. It is the file called WD.BAT.
  • Open WD.BAT with a plain text-editor (notepad), do not use a word processor to edit the file!!
  • Find the line that starts PS2PDF.BAT (line number 67, near the bottom of WD.BAT), by default it looks like:
  • Add the 2 options to this line so it looks like:
  • Be sure to include the “quotes” as shown. When you now start the task, new PDF files will be password protected with the password secret.

Copyright © 2003-2006 GdP Software. All rights reserved.

PostScript skills

PostScript

About Steve Friedl

PostScript skills

I’ve been using the PostScript imaging language for more than ten years and am quite comfortable with solving problems with this technology. I have grown to “think” in terms of the PostScript stack, which makes hand coding almost second nature.

PostScript Generation

For many years I have been creating PostScript output by hand or by translation, and these are a few of the many projects I’ve worked on using this fine display language.

My Business Logo The three-red-bricks logo found at the top of all of my web pages is actually my business logo that I created by hand about ten years ago. I’m not terribly graphically inclined, so I wanted something simple that could be easily represented in Encapsulated PostScript. It’s turned out to be a great design element for my web site — quite a very happy accident.

PostScript Forms A customer in the payroll business prints thousands of Federal Forms W-2 in January of every year, and I have written the PostScript software that their proprietary payroll system uses to print the forms. Their software outputs the per-W2 data in the form of PostScript variables, and the UNIX lp spooler system intercepts this and overlays the overall form structure around it. This has been in use since 1997, and it’s worked flawlessly. The PostScript source code for the 1997 Form W2 is in the file w2-1997-ps.txt, and clicking on the W2 logo above brings up a sample output form (though rendered at lower resolution for web presentation). Each possible fill-in form box has a red overlay that labels what goes there, and it was the programmer’s “cheat sheet”. Real output always in black only with employee data.

PostScript Interpreter Support

For many years I was responsible for integration and maintenance of the PostScript clone interpreter found in the VSI-FAX UNIX facsimile system. We licensed the excellent PowerPage interpreter from Pipeline Associates (since bought by Electronics for Imaging), and I became proficient in tracking down compatibility problems when customers presented documents that would not image correctly.

In most cases we found that the customer’s output was taking liberties with PostScript by relying on undefined behavior or accidents of a particular implementation: we typically were able to find a way to work around these issues in our own code. Now and then I found a real bug in the interpreter, which was always fed back to the vendor.

Porting the software to the AT&T 3B2 platform was quite a task, because char variables were signed by default, and there was no way to disable this as was the case on other platforms. A very strong background in the C langugage made it possible to understand these sign-extensions issues and fix them.

I’ve also done very substantial work with GhostScript, having written a driver for a color printer using it and porting it to an embedded environment.

PostScript Files – The Geometer s Sketchpad Resource Center

PostScript

FAQ: PostScript Files

How do I create PostScript output files (such as .eps, .ps, or .pdf)?

PostScript files can be easily imported into many other applications. With the right printer drivers, Sketchpad sketches can be exported as Postscript (in .eps, .ps, or .pdf format) and used in other documents. Exporting your sketch in PostScript, rather than just copying the objects in your sketch and pasting them into another document, is useful when you are typesetting production graphics in environments such as TeX or Quark.

Creating PostScript files under Windows

Create an image in Sketchpad. Choose File | Print. Select the “Generic Postscript Printer” from the list of printers. Choose “Print to File” and click the Properties button. On the Properties page, click “Advanced.” In the options dialog that appears, set the PostScript Output Option to EPS. Click OK twice to return to the Print dialog. Click OK in the Print dialog, and then change the output file name to use the extension “.eps”.

Difficulties with Windows 7

Some Windows 7 printer drivers are unable to print .eps files. In this case the following steps should help:

PostScript Language Reference, 3rd Edition, InformIT

PostScript

PostScript Language Reference, 3rd Edition

  • Your Price: $39.99
  • List Price: $49.99
  • Available on demand.

Description

  • Copyright 1999
  • Dimensions: 7-3/8×9-1/8
  • Pages: 912
  • Edition: 3rd
  • Book
  • ISBN-10: 0-201-37922-8
  • ISBN-13: 978-0-201-37922-8

The PostScript language is widely recognized as the industry standard for page description. Incorporated into a broad range of printers, imagesetters, and computer displays, PostScript describes exactly how text, sampled images, and graphics will appear on a printed page or on a computer screen.

The PostScript Language Reference, known as the Red Book, is the complete and authoritative reference manual for the PostScript language. Prepared by Adobe Systems Incorporated, the creators and stewards of the PostScript standard, it documents the syntax and semantics of the language, the Adobe imaging model, and the effects of the graphics operators. This Third Edition has been updated to include LanguageLevel 3 extensions, which unify a number of previous extensions and introduce many new features, such as high-fidelity color, support for masked images, and smooth shading capabilities.

Book Highlights:

  • Explains fundamentals of the PostScript language, graphics, fonts, device control, and rendering
  • Organizes all PostScript operators through LanguageLevel 3, both by function and alphabetically
  • Describes operands, results, side effects, and possible errors for each operator
  • Appendices include numerous useful tables and other valuable information

The Red Book is the definitive resource for all PostScript programmers.

Support File(s)

Untitled Document Download the CD Contents for PostScript® Language Reference, Third Edition

Sample Content

Table of Contents

About This Manual.

Evolution of the PostScript Language.

LanguageLevel 3 Overview.

Copyrights and Trademarks.

Raster Output Devices.

Page Description Languages.

Using the PostScript Language.

Data Types and Objects.

Overview of Basic Operators.

File Input and Output.

Early Name Binding.

Filtered Files Details.

Binary Encoding Details.

Coordinate Systems and Transformations.

Organization and Use of Fonts.

Glyph Metric Information.

Unique ID Generation.

Additional Base Font Types.

Font Derivation and Modification.

Using Page Devices.

Page Device Parameters.

Output Device Dictionary.

CIE-Based Color to Device Color.

Conversions among Device Color Spaces.

Scan Conversion Details.

LanguageLevel 3 Features.

LanguageLevel 2 Features.

Virtual Memory Use.

Properties of User and System Parameters.

Defined User and System Parameters.

Details of User and System Parameters.

The LanguageLevel Approach.

When to Provide Compatibility.

Standard Latin Character Set.

StandardEncoding Encoding Vector.

ISOLatin1Encoding Encoding Vector.

CE Encoding Vector.

Expert Character Set.

Expert Encoding Vector.

ExpertSubset Encoding Vector.

Symbol Character Set 786.

Symbol Encoding Vector.

Appendix G. Operator Usage Guidelines.

In the 1980s, Adobe devised a powerful graphics imaging model that over time has formed the basis for the Adobe PostScript technologies. These technologies–a combination of the PostScript language and PostScript language-based graphics and text-formatting applications, drivers, and imaging systems–have forever changed the printing and publishing world by sparking the desktop and digital publishing revolutions. Since their inception, PostScript technologies have enabled unprecedented control of the look and feel of printed documents and have changed the overall process for designing and printing them as well. The capabilities PostScript makes possible have established it as the industry page description language standard.

Today, as never before, application developers and imaging systems vendors support the PostScript language as the industry standard. We at Adobe accept our responsibility as stewards of this standard to continually advance the standard in response to the creative needs of the industry.

With this third advance of the language, which we call LanguageLevel 3, Adobe has greatly expanded the boundaries of imaging capabilities made possible through the PostScript language. This most recent advance has yielded significant improvements in the efficiency and performance of the language as well as in the quality of final output.

To complement the strengths of LanguageLevel 3, Adobe PostScript 3 imaging system technologies have been engineered to exploit the new LanguageLevel 3 constructs to the fullest extent, fulfilling the Adobe commitment to provide printing solutions for the broad spectrum of users.

No significant change comes without the concerted effort of many individuals. The work to advance the PostScript language and to create Adobe PostScript 3 imaging system technologies is no exception. Our goal since the introduction of the first Adobe imaging model has been nothing less than to provide the most innovative, meaningful imaging solutions in the industry. Dedicated Adobe employees and many industry partners have striven to make that goal a reality. We take this opportunity to thank all those who contributed to this effort.

John Warnock and Chuck Geschke

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