These Are the 3 Worst Words You Can Put on Your LinkedIn Profile

While LinkedIn is a social media tool, it’s not like the others. LinkedIn is your personal website for your career. You are a business-of-one that must sell its services to employers over the course of your career. Having a strong LinkedIn profile is a good way to market your business-of-one. Unfortunately, I see people making all sorts of mistakes on the platform. Some include:

  • bad/no profile photo
  • too much/too little information
  • writing in the 3rd person
  • overly subjective text (i.e. guru, ninja, etc.)
  • poor networking etiquette

But, there’s one mistake job seekers are making that’s the kiss-of-death.

If you do this, you’re marketing desperation – and, nobody buys desperation.

You might think letting the world know you’re, “actively seeking opportunities” is a good idea, but it actually works against you. Studies show there are several reasons why this hurts the effectiveness of your profile. For example, it’s been proven recruiters have serious hiring bias. They prefer to hire someone who is currently working. Thus, when you put, “actively seeking opportunities” on your profile, you’re giving the impression you’re unemployed. Not to mention, it screams desperation.

Send the message the right way = toggle the switch.

You can still make the point to recruiters you are seeking new job opportunities on LinkedIn. There’s actually a privacy setting that lets you indicate secretly on your profile that you’re looking for a new job. Then, when a recruiter searches for someone with your skill sets, your profile rises in the search results. Out of the 500 million users of LinkedIn, only 12 million of them have toggled the switch on as of the beginning of 2018. That means you have a chance to really stand out, without screaming desperation.

P.S. Let your skill sets do the talking.

The best way to optimize your LinkedIn profile is to make sure you have included all the key skill sets you want to be found on. For example, if you’re in marketing, you need to look at all the skills required to do your job and make sure they’re included in the headline, summary, work history, and endorsement sections of your profile. Why? LinkedIn’s search algorithm is much like the one on Google. It looks at the relevance of your profile based on the search terms. So, the more optimized your profile is with the kinds of keywords a recruiter uses to find a candidate like you, the more likely you are to show up in their search results.

Asking This 1 Question Too Soon in a Job Interview Makes Hiring Managers Cringe

The interview is going great. You’re relaxed and confident.  The hiring manager has been smiling and laughing at your jokes. You feel in the zone. This is the place for you. Eventually, the hiring manager says, “Do you have any questions for me?” Of course you do. Studies show people who ask questions in the interview make a better impression and are more likely to get hired. Unless, the first question they ask is a deal-breaker…

What you ask first defines your true motives.

Asking questions to the hiring manager gives them a sense of what matters to you. Think about it – you’re asking the questions to seek clarity. The hiring manager will assess what you inquire about to see where your head’s at with respect to the job. They’re hoping you’ll ask questions about the job, the culture, and ways to be successful. They want to feel confident you realize the importance of the role and are excited about the opportunity. They also want to make sure you understand how you’ll need to add value and make an impact on their company. So, when your first question is: 

“What are the pay and benefits like?”

You’re sending the equivalent to a sucker-punch to the hiring manager’s gut. What becomes immediately clear is money is your primary motivator. Instead of being focused on how to exceed the employer’s expectations so you can build a lasting partnership, you just want to know what’s in it for you. 

Wait until you get “buy” signals from the hiring manager.

The time to discuss pay and benefits is when the employer has made it clear you’re someone they want to move forward with in the process. In fact, 99 percent of the time, if a hiring manager is interested they’ll flat out tell you the compensation range or ask you for your salary requirements to make sure you’re both on the same page. Don’t jeopardize moving forward in the process by asking about pay too soon!

P.S. – Ask questions that focus on their needs, not yours.

Having a list of questions pulled together to ask at the end of the interview should be part of every job seeker’s pre-interview preparation. Those questions should be focused on the hiring manager, the role itself, and ways in which you can make yourself a better match for the employer. Remember, you’re a business-of-one trying to sell your services to the hiring manager. It’s about them, not you. Your time to get clarity on what’s in it for you will come when you’re sitting in the driver’s seat with an offer letter!
 

1 Vital Tip for Getting a Job in Another City or State

Job search is already hard enough. Spending free time applying to jobs and praying employers will contact you is a real test of confidence. The waiting and rejection aren’t for the faint of heart. And, when you want to find a job in another city or state, the added layer of complexity makes it even more challenging. The fact is, you’ve got extra forces working against you that make it hard to even get a hiring manager to consider you. Here are three reasons why you can’t get a job interview in another location:

1. You aren’t showing up in recruiter searches on LinkedIn.

Recruiters use LinkedIn daily to search for candidates that match certain skill set criteria. They narrow the search by location. If your profile doesn’t list the city they put in, you don’t show in the search. Now, you might be tempted to change your profile so that you do show up in searches, but I don’t advise it. Why? When a recruiter contacts you and says, “Can you come in for an interview tomorrow?” you’ll have to admit you don’t live there. Getting caught in a lie is the kiss of death. Recruiters don’t like being lied to and will eliminate you from consideration AND may even mark it in your file so you can’t get jobs there in the future.

2. Hiring someone from out-of-town is extra work.

Recruiters feel intense pressure to quickly find good candidates that meet all the hiring manager’s criteria. After all, it’s their job! Presenting a candidate who lives out-of-town makes it look like they are incapable of sourcing quality candidates in their own backyard. It also creates more work for the recruiter. Why waste time talking to someone who can’t easily come in for an interview? They’d rather source locally to make the hiring process easier.

3. Employers don’t want to pay relocation fees for someone that may not work out.

Moving isn’t cheap. Employers avoid footing the bill for relocation as much as possible. It’s usually only done for key positions where the right person for the job is extremely difficult to locate (i.e. c-suite, specialty roles). Even then, the fear is the person may not work out and it will be a wasted expense. Thus, unless you’re at the executive level, it’s likely you won’t get your move paid for by an employer. Seeing you’d need to move for the job immediately makes you more expensive to hire – and that gets you in the “no” pile.

So, what can you do to overcome these roadblocks?

Use the “Interview Bucket List” approach to focus your job search.

Identifying a list of 10-20 employers who can hire for your skill set in the location you wish to move is the goal of your Interview Bucket List.  First, you use your network to connect with people who already work there. Next, you let them know you are planning to relocate to the area. It’s even better if you can tell them you’ll be there by a certain month so they know you mean it. Lastly, explain why they’re a company you aspire to work for when you get there. Ask if they can introduce you to a recruiter or hiring manager so you can learn what it would take to eventually earn a position there. You’d be amazed at how many people will be open to chatting with you. In my experience, there’s a “welcome wagon” effect that occurs. It’s in our nature to be nice to people new to the neighborhood. This can set the foundation for ongoing communication that can lead to a job interview.

P.S. – Setting up a target visit date boosts the effects.

In working with many remote job seekers, I’ve found those who plan a trip to where they want to relocate to can be a great way to schedule in-person informational interviews with people who work at the companies on your bucket list. Being able to say, “I’ll be in the area the week of __, would be available for me to stop in and say “Hi” for a few minutes so I can meet you in person?” It’s simple gesture that doesn’t put pressure on them but can lead to things like an office tour or a an improptu interview. By meeting you in person, they’ll be able to vouch for you at a later date when you apply for a job and can’t easily get there for an in-person interview. 

This 50-Year-Old Was Afraid of Age Bias. This 1 Thing Made Him Completely Fearless

In my profession, we talk a lot about the ugly truths of trying to get hired. Hiring is discrimination. A recruiter or hiring manager must choose one candidate over another. Often, there are dozens of equally qualified candidates, which makes narrowing down the options all that much harder. The result is lots of job seekers getting rejected, and then looking for answers to justify why they weren’t picked. Age discrimination is a common reason people come up with. 

Thus, when Todd Palmer shared with me recently how he overcame his fear of age bias via skydiving, I asked to share it with the world. I could try to write a motivational article and fill it with stats and facts. But, nothing compares to hearing the story in his own words…

“On a brisk fall day, I was hooked up to an instructor and thrust out a plane at 15,000 feet in the beautiful Pacific Northwest.  It was amazing to see the mountains in the distance, to hover around clouds, and have that rollercoaster ‘pit in the stomach’ feel as you dropped.  I was 47 and hooked.

Fast forward 8 months.  Having completed all the training for an A license which would allow me to free-fall on my own I now found myself surrounded by ton’s of 20-somethings that were doing amazing freefly tricks in the air.  Around these folks I was more nervous than the entire time I was in training.  I had to now prove, without any pretense of age equaling experience, that I could keep up, be unique, contribute to the fun and hold my own. 

Like in any community though, you need to be visible and active.  I hung out at the drop zone (the airfield we jump at) working to prove I was safe and knew my crap.  I was present, active and engaged.  It took about 3 weeks but people started to ‘see’ my enthusiasm and began including me in their jumps.  From the newest to the most experienced jumpers, they were happy to teach the ‘old guy’ how to fly.  They also understood and were ok when I wasn’t able to quite nail stuff (I just don’t have the reflexes of a 20yo) because everyone knew I’d not give up and maybe even find an easier way. With each jump, mutual trust was built and I found my new friends were also coming to me (sometimes in confidence) when they were struggling.  

Having turned 50, I am keenly aware of actual/perceived age-ism in recruiting.  It is a concern older adults are discussing as they feel their talents and experience have been sidelined for newer technology (i.e. youth) and lower pay (i.e. youth). However, I’m telling myself a different story.  One that came from my experiences in skydiving. 

If I am jazzed about the opportunity, my youth will shine through and I’ll be respected for it. The right opportunity will come along and those that see me enthusiastically working ‘at it’ and creating value will bring me on board!  Those that don’t? Well do I really want to jump (work) with them anyway?”

What career-limiting stories are controlling your thoughts?

It’s human nature to rationalize. In order to feel a sense of control, we tell ourselves stories to justify how we’ve interpreted life events. Unfortunately, many of us limit our potential with stories that make us believe we can’t overcome things like age discrimination. Neuro-linguistic programming, a/k/a negative self-talk (NST) loves to sabotage career goals. If you’re struggling to make changes or advancements in your career, be honest and ask yourself, “Are there any negative talk-tracks in my head holding me back?” I guarantee there are at least a few.

P.S. – Find like-minded people to help you keep NST in check.

The secret to crushing our negative talk-tracks is to surround ourselves with people who don’t buy into the negativity. Seeking out peers who will offer insights and perspectives to counteract these limiting thoughts gives us the opportunity retrain our brain to think more positively and creatively. It’s hard to go negative when you are surrounded by people who won’t let you!

4 Surprising Ways Money Really Can Buy Happiness, According to Science

You’ve heard it over and over: Money doesn’t buy happiness. Even if people didn’t keep telling you that, you might guess from the large number of extremely wealthy people with drug or alcohol addiction, depression, or even suicidal tendencies. You may even have experienced it yourself, when that last raise or bonus didn’t increase your own happiness. Neither did the extra money in your bank account or the new gadget or nice piece of clothing you splurged on.

But before you give up on money as a source of pleasure, you should know that there are some times when scientific research shows money truly can buy happiness. Money really can make you happy whenever one or more of the following is true: 

1. You spend it on extra time.

A fascinating study of 4,400 Americans showed pretty definitively that people who value time over money are happier than those who don’t. So go ahead and hire that housekeeper or virtual assistant, and splurge for that grocery delivery service. It’s highly likely that you’ll be glad you did.

2. You spend it on a great experience.

We tend to assume it’s wiser to spend money on things–especially things that might appreciate in value–rather than fun. After all, if you spend $300 on a really nice smartphone today, you’ll still have that smartphone the next day and the day after. If you spend that $300 on really great seats to see your favorite band, the next day, you’ll have nothing.

In fact, the opposite is true, researchers at San Francisco State University discovered. Although people tend to believe that buying physical things will make them happier for longer than spending money on experiences because physical things last longer, in fact as we get used to owning that great new gadget or necklace, the happiness it causes fades into the background. (I experienced this myself when after years of wanting one, I bought an electric car. For the first couple of months, just seeing it sitting out in the yard caused a definite jolt of joy. I still love it, but now I’m used to it and that intense reaction has gone away.)

On the other hand, a great experience such as going to the concert will stay in your memory for a long time, and is likely to cause you enjoyment every time you think back on it, and every time you tell someone else about it. Experiences may not last as long as things, but the pleasure they cause lasts longer.

3. You spend it with someone you care about.

Human being are social by nature and there’s plenty of evidence that both a healthy relationship with a significant other and feeling part of a community can help you live longer. (Conversely, loneliness can kill you.)

Some social psychologists believe that one reason experiences seem to make us happier than things is that we often share them with a friend, partner, or family member. So if you do decide to get those great concert tickets, make sure to bring someone along whose company you enjoy. And if you really must buy that new phone, bring someone along on your shopping trip.

4. You spend it on someone else.

When researchers gave college students some extra cash and instructed one group to spend it on themselves and another group to spend it on others, the second group reported much more happiness than the first.

It makes sense if you think about our social orientation–giving money away or spending it on someone else makes us feel more connected to others. (As well as proud of our own generosity.) The thanks and warm fuzzies we get from the recipient of our largesse is likely to make us feel good as well. So go ahead and buy that nice present or make that charitable donation. You’ll be making yourself happier, as well as others.

Spend within your means.

While wealth doesn’t necessarily bring happiness, worry over excessive debt and having trouble paying your bills will definitely make you unhappy. If you spend more than you can afford, even on experiences or gifts, the stress you’ll feel as a result will most likely outweigh any pleasure the money gave you. So don’t go there. Make sure you have enough money to cover your bills, plus unexpected expenses, before you spend it on experiences, gifts, or even objects. Whether or not money makes you happy, make sure it doesn’t make you miserable. 

4 Surprising Ways Money Really Can Buy Happiness, According to Science

You’ve heard it over and over: Money doesn’t buy happiness. Even if people didn’t keep telling you that, you might guess from the large number of extremely wealthy people with drug or alcohol addiction, depression, or even suicidal tendencies. You may even have experienced it yourself, when that last raise or bonus didn’t increase your own happiness. Neither did the extra money in your bank account or the new gadget or nice piece of clothing you splurged on.

But before you give up on money as a source of pleasure, you should know that there are some times when scientific research shows money truly can buy happiness. Money really can make you happy whenever one or more of the following is true: 

1. You spend it on extra time.

A fascinating study of 4,400 Americans showed pretty definitively that people who value time over money are happier than those who don’t. So go ahead and hire that housekeeper or virtual assistant, and splurge for that grocery delivery service. It’s highly likely that you’ll be glad you did.

2. You spend it on a great experience.

We tend to assume it’s wiser to spend money on things–especially things that might appreciate in value–rather than fun. After all, if you spend $300 on a really nice smartphone today, you’ll still have that smartphone the next day and the day after. If you spend that $300 on really great seats to see your favorite band, the next day, you’ll have nothing.

In fact, the opposite is true, researchers at San Francisco State University discovered. Although people tend to believe that buying physical things will make them happier for longer than spending money on experiences because physical things last longer, in fact as we get used to owning that great new gadget or necklace, the happiness it causes fades into the background. (I experienced this myself when after years of wanting one, I bought an electric car. For the first couple of months, just seeing it sitting out in the yard caused a definite jolt of joy. I still love it, but now I’m used to it and that intense reaction has gone away.)

On the other hand, a great experience such as going to the concert will stay in your memory for a long time, and is likely to cause you enjoyment every time you think back on it, and every time you tell someone else about it. Experiences may not last as long as things, but the pleasure they cause lasts longer.

3. You spend it with someone you care about.

Human being are social by nature and there’s plenty of evidence that both a healthy relationship with a significant other and feeling part of a community can help you live longer. (Conversely, loneliness can kill you.)

Some social psychologists believe that one reason experiences seem to make us happier than things is that we often share them with a friend, partner, or family member. So if you do decide to get those great concert tickets, make sure to bring someone along whose company you enjoy. And if you really must buy that new phone, bring someone along on your shopping trip.

4. You spend it on someone else.

When researchers gave college students some extra cash and instructed one group to spend it on themselves and another group to spend it on others, the second group reported much more happiness than the first.

It makes sense if you think about our social orientation–giving money away or spending it on someone else makes us feel more connected to others. (As well as proud of our own generosity.) The thanks and warm fuzzies we get from the recipient of our largesse is likely to make us feel good as well. So go ahead and buy that nice present or make that charitable donation. You’ll be making yourself happier, as well as others.

Spend within your means.

While wealth doesn’t necessarily bring happiness, worry over excessive debt and having trouble paying your bills will definitely make you unhappy. If you spend more than you can afford, even on experiences or gifts, the stress you’ll feel as a result will most likely outweigh any pleasure the money gave you. So don’t go there. Make sure you have enough money to cover your bills, plus unexpected expenses, before you spend it on experiences, gifts, or even objects. Whether or not money makes you happy, make sure it doesn’t make you miserable. 

4 Surprising Ways Money Really Can Buy Happiness, According to Science

You’ve heard it over and over: Money doesn’t buy happiness. Even if people didn’t keep telling you that, you might guess from the large number of extremely wealthy people with drug or alcohol addiction, depression, or even suicidal tendencies. You may even have experienced it yourself, when that last raise or bonus didn’t increase your own happiness. Neither did the extra money in your bank account or the new gadget or nice piece of clothing you splurged on.

But before you give up on money as a source of pleasure, you should know that there are some times when scientific research shows money truly can buy happiness. Money really can make you happy whenever one or more of the following is true: 

1. You spend it on extra time.

A fascinating study of 4,400 Americans showed pretty definitively that people who value time over money are happier than those who don’t. So go ahead and hire that housekeeper or virtual assistant, and splurge for that grocery delivery service. It’s highly likely that you’ll be glad you did.

2. You spend it on a great experience.

We tend to assume it’s wiser to spend money on things–especially things that might appreciate in value–rather than fun. After all, if you spend $300 on a really nice smartphone today, you’ll still have that smartphone the next day and the day after. If you spend that $300 on really great seats to see your favorite band, the next day, you’ll have nothing.

In fact, the opposite is true, researchers at San Francisco State University discovered. Although people tend to believe that buying physical things will make them happier for longer than spending money on experiences because physical things last longer, in fact as we get used to owning that great new gadget or necklace, the happiness it causes fades into the background. (I experienced this myself when after years of wanting one, I bought an electric car. For the first couple of months, just seeing it sitting out in the yard caused a definite jolt of joy. I still love it, but now I’m used to it and that intense reaction has gone away.)

On the other hand, a great experience such as going to the concert will stay in your memory for a long time, and is likely to cause you enjoyment every time you think back on it, and every time you tell someone else about it. Experiences may not last as long as things, but the pleasure they cause lasts longer.

3. You spend it with someone you care about.

Human being are social by nature and there’s plenty of evidence that both a healthy relationship with a significant other and feeling part of a community can help you live longer. (Conversely, loneliness can kill you.)

Some social psychologists believe that one reason experiences seem to make us happier than things is that we often share them with a friend, partner, or family member. So if you do decide to get those great concert tickets, make sure to bring someone along whose company you enjoy. And if you really must buy that new phone, bring someone along on your shopping trip.

4. You spend it on someone else.

When researchers gave college students some extra cash and instructed one group to spend it on themselves and another group to spend it on others, the second group reported much more happiness than the first.

It makes sense if you think about our social orientation–giving money away or spending it on someone else makes us feel more connected to others. (As well as proud of our own generosity.) The thanks and warm fuzzies we get from the recipient of our largesse is likely to make us feel good as well. So go ahead and buy that nice present or make that charitable donation. You’ll be making yourself happier, as well as others.

Spend within your means.

While wealth doesn’t necessarily bring happiness, worry over excessive debt and having trouble paying your bills will definitely make you unhappy. If you spend more than you can afford, even on experiences or gifts, the stress you’ll feel as a result will most likely outweigh any pleasure the money gave you. So don’t go there. Make sure you have enough money to cover your bills, plus unexpected expenses, before you spend it on experiences, gifts, or even objects. Whether or not money makes you happy, make sure it doesn’t make you miserable.